Biotin is otherwise known as vitamin B7 and as one of our best sellers, we thought we’d fill you in on what it is biotin does for you.

Beauty! Hair, Skin & Nails

Hair, skin and nails love biotin! It’s a key ingredient in many leading hair growth tonics, so if you’re looking for a possible solution to thickening and strengthening your tresses, biotin may just be the thing for you. The same goes for nails.

It’s a water soluble vitamin that has an important role in regulating essential fatty acids that preserve the integrity of your skin, keeping it protected and hydrated. B vitamins are also important to the proper functioning of your nervous system, which affect your hormones and so, your skin health. Insufficient biotin can lead to dry skin and cracks on the side of your mouth, acne and skin fungal infections as well as falling hair. It’s been found to have a better effect taken internally, so getting enough in your diet, or supplementing with a good quality supplement is the best route, even for hair.


 

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Metabolism & Blood Sugar

Biotin plays a vital role in your metabolism, and along with the other B vitamins converts carbs into fuel your body can use and helps your body use protein amino acids correctly. It can help give a sluggish metabolism a kickstart.

By optimising the proper use of glucose, it can benefit type 2 diabetes and helps your body use insulin, one of the problems type 2 diabetics can have problems with. B7 has a beneficial effect on your liver too, suppressing excessive sugar production by the liver so that it releases less sugar into the bloodstream. Because of this connection with your metabolism, it can help lessen symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes, such as nerve pain and muscle aches.

Brain & Nerve Health

Biotin has a role in nerve signaling and creating neurotransmitters, as well as the manufacture of hormones that regulate mood, energy and mental clarity. It can be beneficial for keeping your mind sharp and young, and staving off things like age-related dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Thyroid & Adrenals

The B vitamin group are all important for keeping your thyroid functioning properly. Biotin plays an important part in hormonal production and regulation relating to your adrenals and thyroid, which play a major role in your energy levels, weight management and sense of wellbeing.

Build & Repair

As you may have guessed, if biotin is so great for hair, skin and nails, it plays an important role in building body tissues. This extends to repairing and building muscles and boosting muscle strength. Biotin can also help reduce muscle inflammation and pain. In children Vitamin B7 is very important for proper growth and development. This makes it important for pregnant mothers to get enough biotin as their baby develops as it is important for healthy fetal development.

Biotin in Your Diet

Eating a diet high in refined, processed foods puts you more at risk of a biotin deficiency, as well as smoking, or having poor nutrient absorption because of chronic digestive issues such as Chron’s disease.

You can find Biotin in:

• Egg yolks
• Nuts & nut butters such as almonds, pecans, and walnuts
• Legumes
• Whole grains and cereals
• Cauliflower
• Avocados
• Berries
• Bananas
• Mushrooms


From Beauty  to Brains, Biotin plays a full range of roles in keeping our bodies young, fit and strong.